“I’ve worked in other industries, including service industries. I’ve worked as a waitress and barista,” Salazar said. “And in all of those workplace environments, I did not find sexism and gender-based harassment and sexual harassment to be as pervasive as it is in politics in Albany.”

Salazar also remembers a state senator, now retired, who would turn his chair around, rather than face the front of the chamber in the Capitol building, to stare at the woman senators. The move was striking in its deliberateness, she said. And there was a Cuomo staffer who tried to dance with her so persistently and so aggressively at a reception for a work event that she had to leave rather than risk appearing rude by telling him no repeatedly. “There’s a reasonable expectation that you be kind and polite and friendly, and I’m usually happy to be those things,” she said. “But there comes a time where those expectations conflict…

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