The question of ‘data deficits’ – or, better yet, the perception of unequal access to the ‘real’ information – is crucial to understanding how disinformation works, but also to how it can be combatted. The Covid-19 pandemic is not the first time that a health crisis has unleashed fanciful imaginations and a variety of conspiracy theories. In a recent story on the Sydney Morning Herald, Australian philosopher of neuroscience Colin Klein reminds us that when “things are changing rapidly, it’s not actually unreasonable to [assume]some people have more information than others”, with “conspiracy theories born out of the murky feeling that not all is being revealed to us, that the truth is still in shadow, and someone else is pulling the strings”. The fact that conspiracy theories ‘stick’ most powerfully in moments of crisis – and especially in those places and among those publics that feel least ‘in control’…

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