Browsing: Real Estate

Real Estate
Survive, stabilise and grow

Survive, stabilise and grow Hotel management firms shed light on revised strategies Avani Sukhumvit Bangkok hotel, one of Minor’s hotels. Health and safety is a priority of the hotel. The global pandemic has turned the tourism industry upside down, and the future remains uncertain. As the negative outlook is likely to challenge the industry in the upcoming year, global hotel management firms shed light on their revised strategies, particularly how to stay agile during times of crisis. Dillip Rajakarier, chief executive of Minor International Group and Minor Hotels, said the main priorities for the strategic roadmap during and following the outbreak are to survive, stabilise and grow. Immediate priorities include health and safety, business continuity management as well as liquidity and cash flow management. He said all business units have to focus on cash preservation and liquidity management to minimise cash outflow throughout the recovery process. All significant capex investments have been suspended and will only proceed when an obligation

Real Estate
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn: Convenient to Manhattan, but More Affordable

AdvertisementContinue reading the main storySupported byContinue reading the main storyLiving inBay Ridge, Brooklyn: Convenient to Manhattan, but More AffordableAs more buyers discover the neighborhood’s appeal, demand is rising. But homes are still less expensive than in other parts of Brooklyn.Living In … Bay Ridge, Brooklyn16 PhotosView Slide Show ›Karsten Moran for The New York TimesBy

Real Estate
Supalai looks to provincial prospects

Mr Prateep (centre) and Chulalongkorn University announce the winners of a design contest with the concept of future living. SET-listed developer Supalai expects an economic recovery in 2021 as it aims for sales growth and plans to expand low-rise housing projects into additional provinces to diversify risk. Chairman and chief executive Prateep Tangmatitham said the company planned to launch at least 30 new residential projects next year with only 10-20% of them being condo projects. “We will launch only 3-5 condo projects depending on locations as there is a large amount of unsold condo inventory in the market,” he said. “We should wait for a while for them to be absorbed.” The remainder of the projects Supalai will launch next year will be low-rise houses, including single detached houses, semi-detached houses and town houses. The target market for the properties will be new generations who are building a family as demand in this segment remains strong. In 2021,

Real Estate
In a Pandemic, Creative and Mostly Virtual Socializing

Indira Mahabir was scrolling on Facebook late one March night when an ad popped up. It was for Society Las Olas, a new apartment community in downtown Fort Lauderdale, Fla. with low rents and an emphasis on community and social events.Ms. Mahabir, 47, is single, with two adult children, ages 27 and 22. She had been empty-nesting in her four-bedroom home for over a year, and was ready for a change. Society Las Olas, which was still being built, ticked all the boxes: rents started at $1,100; the 34-story tower would have a pool, gym, and a packed calendar of mixers, lectures and classes, all designed to help neighbors meet and mingle.Covid-19 has been a wrench for many residential communities and their social calendars, canceling everything that couldn’t move outdoors or online. But for some, it has been an opportunity, inspiring innovative programming that has served as a lifeline through the lockdown for residents, and even helped attract new tenants in the process.By the time Ms. Mahabir signed a lease, Society Las Olas’s social calendar had been scrapped, a casualty of Covid-19. But she still chose to move in, and calls riding out the pandemic there one of the best

Real Estate
That Home You Made With Your Ex? ‘Say Goodbye to Everything’

When Lindsay Weiss began renovating her home on the edge of Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn, it wasn’t just an opportunity to give the place a new look — it was a chance to make a clean break from a failed relationship.Ms. Weiss, an architect, bought the 922-square-foot, two-bedroom apartment with her boyfriend in 2008, for about $735,000, and filled it with a mix of furniture each of them owned and new pieces they acquired together. By 2011, they had broken up, and Ms. Weiss bought out her ex, who left almost everything behind.For a few years, she focused on her work, doing her best to live in a home that cost plenty but didn’t make her happy. “I hated my furniture,” said Ms. Weiss, 41.“I do this every single day, helping clients make these decisions, but it’s hard to pull the trigger yourself,” said Lindsay Weiss, an architect and a founder of Weiss Turkus Projects.Credit…Robert Wright for The New York TimesAfter she founded the firm Weiss Turkus Projects with Noah Turkus, an interior designer, in 2014, she began dreaming about making a radical change at home, brainstorming design ideas with her new

Real Estate
Homes for Sale in New York and Connecticut

Click on the slide show to see this week’s featured properties:In Bronxville, N.Y.: a five-bedroom, four-and-a-half-bath, 4,400-square-foot, expanded and renovated colonial-style house built in 1909, with fireplaces and coffered ceilings, an eat-in kitchen/great room with a vaulted ceiling, a main bedroom with two baths, a fireplace and a dressing area, a stone front porch and a backyard patio, on 0.4 acres.In Rowayton, Conn.: a three-bedroom, three-bath, 3,392-square-foot home with a living room that has a fireplace, a kitchen with soapstone counters and a breakfast bar, an office, a main suite with a gas fireplace, a bath with radiant-heat flooring and a large dressing room, a third-floor bonus room and a stone patio, on 0.11 acres.For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on Twitter: @nytrealestate.

Real Estate
California Sets Record for Median Home Price As Housing Market Rebounds

Fueled by low interest rates and a historic housing shortage, California’s median home price in September reached $712,430, closing out four straight months of record highs.The state’s housing market briefly cooled in the early months in the coronavirus pandemic, but by June, they were fully on the rebound, with the median sales price reaching $626,200, the highest ever at the time, according to a report from the California Department of Finance. For the next three months, as mortgage rates stayed below 3 percent and many buyers looked to upgrade to larger homes, that number would continue to climb. In August, it exceeded $700,000 for the first time in history.“A lot of people think the pandemic equals the market is suffering, but that’s just not the case,” said Ryan Lundquist, an appraiser based in Sacramento. “It’s the perfect storm of low rates, a housing shortage that we already had and is getting worse, plus heightened demand.”There has been much talk of the exodus triggered by California’s inflated cost of living, which has seen Californians trickle outward to states with a lower cost of living — states like Texas, Nevada, and Arizona — for more than a decade. But while the state

Real Estate
C.P. Land halts offices, condos

C.P. Land halts offices, condos C.P. Land last Friday opened new hotel Fortune Saeng Chan Beach Hotel Rayong with 107 rooms in Muang district, Rayong with an investment of 200 million baht. C.P. Land Plc, a property arm of Charoen Pokphand Group, plans to freeze new office and condo projects next year and focus on hotel development targeting local travellers. President and chief executive Sunthorn Arunanondchai said Thailand’s economic outlook will remain unfavourable in 2021 and could possibly worsen from this year as many people continue to face difficulties earning income. “Government should help low-income earners boost their income. They should assist farmers and the grassroots segment by helping them have regular income,” he said. Though there is optimism about a Covid-19 vaccine by mid-2021, Thailand’s economic recovery might not occur until the end of 2022, said Mr Sunthorn. “In

Real Estate
There’s No Better Time to Clear the Air

Think about the phrase “air pollution.” Are you picturing black plumes curling out of factory smokestacks and the tailpipes of idling vehicles? Something to worry about outdoors, that is, not inside your home? Not so fast: Air pollutants could be within your own walls too, seeping from your furnace, your basement, even that new couch, and their threats range from eye irritation to an increased risk of cancer, and maybe even death.Don’t panic (really). Once you recognize the threats, you can often clean up the air in your home without too much trouble. And as we head into a winter where the pandemic may force us to be at home more than ever, now is a good time to make sure your everyday air is as clean as possible. Here are some of the most common indoor air concerns — and how to deal with them.RadonIn vast swathes of the country, everyday rocks like granite and shale hold deposits of uranium, thorium and radium under the soil. These deposits silently decay into radon, an odorless gas that can seep into homes via minuscule cracks in foundations and floors. Inhaling it (technically, inhaling the radioactive particles that radon produces in the

Real Estate
My Neighbor’s Dogs Are Driving Me Crazy. What Can I Do?

Q: I live in a quiet suburban neighborhood in Metuchen, N.J. Neighbors whose backyard abuts ours have two very large dogs that they leave outside all day, and the dogs bark incessantly and loudly. Six months into this pandemic, my other neighbors and I are stretched to the limit, as we are working from home and the noise diminishes our quality of life. What recourse do we have?A: Dogs left outside all day may bark to communicate with each other, with every passing dog, because they are anxious, or to protect their territory from squirrels and chipmunks. Whatever the reason, incessant barking is the top complaint to animal-control centers, according to Mary R. Burch, an animal behaviorist for the American Kennel Club.The dogs’ owners need to train and supervise their pets. And you need to persuade them to do that. Begin by talking to them. Start from a neutral place, assuming they don’t realize the disturbance the dogs are causing.“Give the neighbor a chance to fix the problem,” Dr. Burch said. “The neighbor might not know her dog barks all day when she is gone.”[embedded content]Explain that the barking interferes with your ability to work. Ask

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