Browsing: Real Estate

Real Estate
They Had Big Plans for the Lockdown. This Is What Happened.

When New York shut down this spring, Joe Harmer set his sights on a hobby.He got a kayak. He bought a camera. He purchased a tablet-style computer on which to sketch. He even ordered a guitar.But as the pandemic drags into its seventh month, all of the items are basically gathering dust save for the new musical instrument.“I was facing extreme isolation, and I didn’t want to have all that time and waste it,” said Mr. Harmer, 42, who works in sales for a tech company and splits his time between Brooklyn and Montauk. “But nothing really stuck.”As pandemic restrictions have slowly lifted, and the city tries to recapture its pre-Covid former self, many New Yorkers are taking stock of how they have spent much of 2020. For essential workers and many people who have been able to work from home, the days and weeks have passed like a blur. For others, who have been fortunate enough to not be struggling financially, emptier days led to helping out at food banks, working phone banks for political campaigns, demonstrating for racial justice, or if they have children, a crash course on home schooling. And for everyone, lockdowns have been about extra

Real Estate
Homes for Sale in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens

Click on the slide show to see this week’s featured properties:In Greenwood Heights, a 1,020-square-foot loft with one bathroom and two sleeping areas, 12.5-foot beamed ceilings, an open kitchen, three arched south-facing windows with deep sills, hardwood floors and an in-unit washer and dryer, in a turn-of-the-century brick school building converted to condos in 2006.In Ridgewood: a Renaissance Revival-style rowhouse built in 1910 in Ridgewood’s Central Historic District, with a three-bedroom, two-bath duplex on top of a one-bedroom, one-bath garden-level unit with 9.6-foot ceilings and a backyard.In Greenwich Village: an 868-square-foot, one-bedroom, one-bath corner unit on the second floor of a midcentury co-op, with a doorman, laundry, a bike room and a common garden.For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on Twitter: @nytrealestate.

Real Estate
Homes for Sale in Westchester and Connecticut

Click on the slide show to see this week’s featured properties:In Fairfield, Conn., a five-bedroom, four-full-and-two-half-bath, 5,690-square-foot house built in 1997, with a two-story entry foyer, a dining room with butler’s pantry, a combined kitchen and family room with a fireplace, a primary suite with a tray ceiling and double sinks and toilets, a mudroom, a walk-in cedar closet, an in-ground pool with a travertine patio and an attached three-car garage, on 1.22 acres in the Greenfield Hill section.In Scarsdale, N.Y.: a five-bedroom, five-and-a-half-bath, 4,667-square-foot, updated 1992 colonial-style house, with a wood-burning fireplace, formal living and dining rooms, an eat-in kitchen, two family rooms, three bedrooms with en suite baths, a stone patio, an in-ground heated saltwater pool and a three-car garage, on 0.72 acres on a cul-de-sac.For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on Twitter: @nytrealestate.

Real Estate
Home Sales Surge in Brooklyn

While Manhattan’s real estate market continued to reel in August, Brooklyn had a near-record number of contract signings, spurred by bargain hunting New Yorkers and pent-up demand from months under quarantine.There were 735 homes in Brooklyn that went into contract in August, a 38.7 percent increase from the same month last year, according to a new report from the real estate listings company StreetEasy. Contract signings were down 6 percent in Manhattan, and 4.3 percent in Queens in the same period. Pending sales data were not available for the Bronx and Staten Island.The large jump in Brooklyn contract signings marks the first time that a borough has recorded year-over-year sales growth since February, before Covid-19 froze the market. The only time more contracts were signed in the borough was March 2019, when 748 deals were entered, said Nancy Wu, an economist for StreetEasy.“It shows us that even in a pandemic, there are people interested in investing in the city long term,” Ms. Wu said, and Brooklyn has been the most popular destination.A top priority for buyers was affordability — at least relative to Manhattan’s stubbornly high prices. Contract signings for the bottom fifth of listings in Brooklyn, where the median

Real Estate
Sansiri makes foray into insurance with Hugs brokerage

SET-listed developer Sansiri Plc has invested 25 million baht in a new venture, Hugs Insurance Broker Co, via wholly owned subsidiary Sansiri China Co to diversify into new business segments. Hugs Insurance Broker was incorporated Monday with initial capital worth 100 million baht with a par value of 100 baht per share. The largest stake is held by Sansiri China Co at 25%. The other major shareholders are Tienbhan Bunsongsikul and Brookton Capital Ltd, holding 20% each. Seamico Securities Plc and Finansa Plc hold 7.5% each, while Wealthy Holding holds 7%. Sansiri chief executive Apichart Chutrakul said the investment takes the company into new business segments to support its core business. The funding came from internal cash flow. Therdsak Thaveethiritham, an analyst at Asia Plus Securities, said the investment is part of business diversification for continuing growth. “Sansiri’s total revenue used to reach 40 billion baht per year in past years, and seems to have reached a saturation point,” Mr Therdsak said. “We can see Sansiri has to diversify into other related businesses such as hotels and startups to contribute additional revenue.” Other real estate companies such as Land & Houses Plc have also diversified with investment in financial

Real Estate
A Canadian Dream House That Took Three Architects to Build

When you build a home from the ground up, there’s one thing that’s more important than the concrete, the lumber, the steel or nearly anything else: patience.For Jack and Araxi Evrensel, that became abundantly clear when they began start-and-stop work on a house that clings to a steep slope of granite at the edge of Burrard Inlet, in West Vancouver, Canada. By the time the house was completed, they had spent eight years working on it, with three different architects.The couple tried to take each delay in stride. “We took our time, because we weren’t in any rush,” said Mr. Evrensel, a former restaurateur who sold his five upscale British Columbia restaurants in 2014. Although they were eager to see their dream house built, they were fortunate enough to be able to stay in their old home as long as they needed to, and were focused on getting things right.ImageJack Evrensel on one of the home’s many terraces.  Credit…Ema Peter for The New York Times“We were very lucky to find this spot,” Mr. Evrensel said. “I loved the idea of the waterfront and that it’s just an outcropping of pure rock.”The Evrensels, who are in

Real Estate
AWC moulds strategy into shipshape

A new landmark, the tall ship Sirimahannop, has been added for when Asiatique The Riverfront reopens next month. SET-listed Asset World Corp Plc (AWC), a property arm of billionaire Charoen Sirivadhanabhakdi’s TCC Group, has revised its hotel and retail strategy to target Thai tourists, as the inbound market may not revive until late in the third quarter of 2021. “The tourism trend will get positive vibes early next year,” said AWC chief executive and president Wallapa Traisorat. “A number of international tourists can get back to pre-Covid level in the second half of 2021.” The company will reopen its flagship Asiatique The Riverfront on Oct 15 after shutting down since May. AWC spent 300 million baht adding new attractions to the site, including the Sirimahannop tall ship worth 135 million baht, with a target to draw 20,000-30,000 visitors a day on weekends — fewer than the pre-Covid number of 50,000. Asiatique will feature a restaurant and bar operated by Marriott

Real Estate
Wary of slow market, Eastern Star delays project launches to 2021

Wary of slow market, Eastern Star delays project launches to 2021 Developer says demand remains but buyers are shy Torsak Lertsrisakulrat, Eastern Star Real Estate Plc (ESTAR) Managing director After the continuous launching of new projects in the past few years, the emergence of the pandemic has led SET-listed developer Eastern Star Real Estate Plc (ESTAR) to take a more careful path. To tackle an economic slowdown and sluggish property market that are likely to last until the end of 2021, the company must delay new projects from their earlier launch dates in 2020, said managing director Torsak Lertsrisakulrat. Under these circumstances, it’s necessary to monitor the property market situation closely in the fourth quarter, Mr Torsak said. “Real demand remains, but customers are hesitant to buy a house due to shrinking confidence,” he said. “The outlook worsened after the coronavirus pandemic.” At the same time, investment buyers in the condo market were already attracted by heavy discounts and tempting deals from completed, unsold units offered in the second quarter. An artist’s impression of

Real Estate
Homes for Sale in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens

Click on the slide show to see this week’s featured properties:In Carnegie Hill: a 600-square-foot, one-bedroom, one-bath apartment with a 600-square-foot wraparound terrace at the top of 10-story, full-service prewar building with a doorman and laundry room.In Prospect Heights: a one-bedroom, one-bath apartment with painted parquet floors, a windowed galley kitchen with butcher block countertops and stainless-steel appliances and backsplash, a large living room, and four closets, in a prewar, pet-friendly walk-up building with a bike room and basement storage. Steven Gottlieb, 917-575-1225, June Gottlieb, 917-826-9996, Emily Becker, 917-439-0639, Warburg Realty; warburgrealty.comIn Jackson Heights: a 1,100-square-foot, two-bedroom, one-bath apartment with a sunny living room and fireplace on the second floor of a five-story prewar building with a garden, bike storage, laundry and a live-in super.For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on Twitter: @nytrealestate.

Real Estate
$1.4 Million Homes in Connecticut, New York and South Carolina

What You Get for $1.4 Million24 PhotosView Slide Show ›Michael BowmanCornwall, Conn. | $1.395 MillionA stone house dating to 1922 with four bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms, on a five-acre lot with a pond and a waterfallWhen Charlotte Bronson Hunnewell Martin built the great stone house known as Cornwall Castle as a country retreat in the 1920s, she added a pottery to the estate and hired an Italian potter named Vincenzo Rondinone to run it. The building, which has a dozen gables and 18-inch-thick fieldstone walls, was eventually converted into a residence. In the late 1990s, the potter’s son, Nicholas Rondinone, an architect, bought it, updated it and built additions. The current owners bought the property in 2000 and installed a new kitchen. They also added a detached two-car garage.The house is in rural Litchfield County, about 100 miles northeast of New York City and 150 miles southwest of Boston. It is about three miles southwest of the Cornwall village center and Mohawk Mountain ski area and eight miles southeast of Housatonic Meadows State Park.Size: 2,599 square feetPrice per square foot: $537Indoors: The main entrance opens into the original kitchen — a rebuilt foyer with radiant-heated limestone floors,

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