Since the early 1990s, I, together with my colleagues, have been studying the economic burden of adults with major depressive disorders (MDD). Over that time, we have tracked shifts in the prevalence of this disease; in the makeup of those suffering from it; and in the nature of treatment both for the disease itself and for the host of comorbidities, such as pain and anxiety disorders, that accompany it. We have then used these data as the basis for calculating the incremental economic burden of adults with MDD—that is, the additional costs traceable to those suffering from the disease in terms of both medical treatment and workplace productivity impacts.

Our most recent study was just published in a special issue of PharmacoEconomics (which I also co-edited) that presents new research on the economics of MDD. By focusing on one year during the Great Recession (2010) and another after a long macroeconomic expansion (2018), our…

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